Monthly Archive: March 2016

The Rail Yard’s Ghost

Yep, I’m still tied up with my manuscript titled Camelot Games. If you’re still reading, then you might realize I serialized a short story about one of my family’s favorite, around-the-old-campfire ghost stories. Flip back if you need to catch up, and I hope you enjoy reading as much as I did recalling. Ollie BTW – The story will be part of a near future anthology (sans serialization) so let me know if you like my work. I’d be honored to send you a copy some day. In Part Three, luck or providence spare the lives of Louie and George Theiler. The job where one was fired and the other quit became the charnel house of legends. Instead, they’d left for a promised job from an unsavory character in the… Read more >

Experience: Final installment for Wind and Water

I count myself among the few lucky enough to have experienced piloting an aircraft above 70,000 Feet (close to 15 miles above the earth’s surface).  The U-2 Dragon Lady is the only operational air breathing aircraft currently capable of reaching such altitudes.  It is also an aircraft  of notoriety as a result of the Soviet Union shooting one down on May Day 1960 and detaining the pilot, Gary Powers.  The incident was a core component to the plot for the recent film titled, “Bridge of Spies.” Part of the interview process for becoming a U-2 pilot required prospective pilots to fly a two seat version of the aircraft in order to demonstrate flying skills needed to handle the unique characteristics of the Dragon Lady.  A high altitude flight was not part… Read more >

Squatter

Some years ago I was flipping through the channels in a corporate housing unit somewhere and I stumbled on to this popular cop type show. I do not remember its name, but it was the best of a bad situation so I watched it. Glad I did. You could chalk this up as another entry in the “teach something no matter how small” list, but it isn’t. This show must have been where one or more of “The West Wing” writers landed. Police were investigating some murder and the only witness to the actual crime was a squatter. Oh, for sure, there was as intricate a murder plot as television could squeeze into a single episode, but the side story of the squatter is what caught my attention. Just let… Read more >

Rail Yard’s Ghost (Part Three)

Yep, I’m still tied up with my manuscript titled Camelot Games. If you’re still reading, then you might realize I serialized a short story about one of my family’s favorite, around-the-old-campfire ghost stories. Instead of the scary, untrue story, I wanted to tell you about wonderful grandparents and tough times. Flip back if you need to catch up, and don’t be late next week for the conclusion. I hope you enjoy reading as much as I did recalling. Ollie BTW – The story will be part of a near future anthology (sans serialization) so let me know if you like my work. I’d be honored to send you a copy some day. In Part Two, Louie revealed to his wife Lillian that he’d quit working on the railroad. Backbreaking labor… Read more >

Experience: More of Wind and Water

Anyone who’s ever studied the art of navigation is familiar with the name, Bowditch.  Years ago, one of my three sons was intrigued by numbers (and still is).  When he was ten years old, he read a book titled, Carry on Mr. Bowditch, about the life of the famous mathematician and navigator, Nathaniel Bowditch.  In all his youth and innocence, my son was eager to share his fascination, asking me many questions about such things as “hour angles” and “sight reduction tables.”  Why my son might have thought I knew of such things, I’ll chalk up as a child’s naivety and the belief that adults know lots of stuff.  In my case, I really didn’t know much, but I did have some experience with celestial navigation. In my younger years, being a surfer with an appetite… Read more >

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